Optokinetic Training

OPK Treatment Progression. Use in the Clinic or Provide to Your Patients as Part of a Home Program. Enjoy 30% off: Get 48 Total Videos for Just $40.50!

ViD/VIMS

Visually Induced Dizziness (ViD) or Visually Induced Motion Sensitivity (VIMS) is dizziness triggered by a complex, distorted, large field or moving visual stimulus including the relative motion of the visual surround associated with body movement (Bisdorff et al., 2009) while motion sensitivity relates to provoked symptoms by being in or on a moving object. ViD/VIMS has been referred to as a visual-vestibular mismatch (Mallinson & Longridge, 2004) or visual vertigo (Bronstein, 1995).

Identifying neural mechanisms of how and why ViD/VIMS occurs remain poorly understood. Researchers have suggested individuals with these symptoms have an over-reliance on visual cues when it might be more appropriate to use somatosensory or vestibular inputs for balance (Maire et al., 2017). It is also largely agreed upon and recommended that visual desensitization activities be included in the vestibular rehabilitation program.

In our outpatient vestibular/balance clinic, we utilize exposure to optokinetic stripes for patients with ViD/VIMS. And, one of our clinicians (Dr. Kendal Reddell, PT, DPT, NCS) who also works in a hospital-based rehab center uses optokinetic stripes in patients with Wallenberg's Syndrome. She finds the stripes help patients orient back to midline.

As noted in the literature, OPK stimulation has shown to be an effective intervention in patients with ViD/VMID (Dai et al., 2014 and Pavlou, 2010). It is important, however, that the exposure start in small doses and gradually progress as tolerated with very clear instructions that are structured (Hoppes et al., 2018 and Bronstein, 2016).

Optokinetic Video Progressions

This is the rationale for creating these series of optokinetic video progressions. You can use these videos in the clinic or provide to your patients as part of a home program. We typically start with shorter durations to minimize anxiety about the exposure.

We have also found that patients usually like the option of looking at a target, so we start with a fixed target in the center then progress to a moving target then to no target. Once the patient can tolerate this progression, we increase the duration of the exposure.

It is also recommended that you begin these exercises in a more stable position (e.g., standing) and progress to less stable positions (e.g., standing on a firm surface with a wide base of support to more narrow then progressing to unstable surfaces) and perform at varying distances from the screen. Although there are currently no clearly defined parameters on screen size, it is generally agreed that a phone is too small, so using a larger desktop screen or television monitor is recommended (Pavlou, 2013).

The Optokinetic Training Videos are divided into the following sections:

  1. 10 Second Videos
  2. 30 Second Videos
  3. 60 Second Videos
  4. 120 Second Videos


10 Seconds Left with Center Target and Box Breathing

Start with Shorter Durations to Minimize Anxiety about the Exposure Then Progress to Longer Durations


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Frequently Asked Questions


How many videos are there total?
There are 48 total videos: 12 ten-second videos, 12 thirty-second videos, 12 sixty-second videos, and 12 one hundred twenty-second videos.
How long do I have access to the videos?
How does lifetime access sound? After you purchase the videos, you have unlimited access to the videos for as long as you like - across any and all devices you own.
What is the recommended screen size?
Although there is currently no clearly defined parameters on screen size, it is generally agreed that a phone is too small, so using a larger desktop screen or television monitor is recommended (Pavlou, 2013).
What is the recommendation on how to begin using these exercises?
It is also recommended that you begin these exercises in a more stable position (e.g., standing) and progress to less stable positions (e.g., standing on a firm surface with a wide base of support to more narrow then progressing to unstable surfaces) and perform at varying distances from the screen.